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Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press
February 21 - March 24, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 21 , 2013,
7:00-10:00 p.m.

The Vietnam War, class inequality, black liberation, and women’s struggles—against this backdrop of social upheaval, a rebellious counterculture produced a vibrant underground newspaper scene. In four short years, from 1965 to 1969, the underground press grew from five small newspapers in as many cities in the United States to over five hundred newspapers—with millions of readers—all over the world. Completely circumventing (and subverting) establishment media by utilizing its own news service and freely sharing content among the papers, the underground press at its height became the unifying institution for the alternative culture of the 1960s and 1970s. It also allowed for all sorts of intriguing and compelling art, design, and writing on its pages.

Interference Archive is pleased to host the exhibition Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press, curated by Sean Stewart, editor of On the Ground: An Illustrated Anecdotal History of the Sixties Underground Press in the U.S. (PM Press, 2011). The show features original copies from Sean’s growing collection of underground newspapers, such as Basta Ya, Berkeley Barb, Berkeley Tribe, Chicago Seed, Helix, It Ain’t Me Babe, Los Angeles Free Press, Osawatomie, Rat Subterranean News, San Francisco Express Times, San Francisco Oracle, Screw: The Sex Review, Black Panther, East Village Other, and Realist, and related artifacts to illustrate the process, graphic sensibilities, historical context, and debates shaping these periodicals.

For more info contact: Cindy Milstein, cbmilstein@yahoo.com

Sean Stewart grew up in Kingston, Jamaica, and is the former owner of Babylon Falling, a bookstore and gallery in San Francisco. He now lives in Brooklyn.

Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press
February 21 - March 24, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 21 , 2013,
7:00-10:00 p.m.

The Vietnam War, class inequality, black liberation, and women’s struggles—against this backdrop of social upheaval, a rebellious counterculture produced a vibrant underground newspaper scene. In four short years, from 1965 to 1969, the underground press grew from five small newspapers in as many cities in the United States to over five hundred newspapers—with millions of readers—all over the world. Completely circumventing (and subverting) establishment media by utilizing its own news service and freely sharing content among the papers, the underground press at its height became the unifying institution for the alternative culture of the 1960s and 1970s. It also allowed for all sorts of intriguing and compelling art, design, and writing on its pages.

Interference Archive is pleased to host the exhibition Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press, curated by Sean Stewart, editor of On the Ground: An Illustrated Anecdotal History of the Sixties Underground Press in the U.S. (PM Press, 2011). The show features original copies from Sean’s growing collection of underground newspapers, such as Basta Ya, Berkeley Barb, Berkeley Tribe, Chicago Seed, Helix, It Ain’t Me Babe, Los Angeles Free Press, Osawatomie, Rat Subterranean News, San Francisco Express Times, San Francisco Oracle, Screw: The Sex Review, Black Panther, East Village Other, and Realist, and related artifacts to illustrate the process, graphic sensibilities, historical context, and debates shaping these periodicals.

For more info contact: Cindy Milstein, cbmilstein@yahoo.com

Sean Stewart grew up in Kingston, Jamaica, and is the former owner of Babylon Falling, a bookstore and gallery in San Francisco. He now lives in Brooklyn.

Sadly Uruguayan printmaker Antionio Frasconi passed away earlier this month, on January 8th. Frasconi was an incredible woodblock printer that produced graphics on a variety of social issues. I was fortunate enough, many years ago, to view his The Disappeared prints at the Desaparecidos exhibition mounted at the Museo Del Barrio. The show was incredibly moving, and like many others,  Frasconi’s works brought tears to my eyes. 
Above is Interference Archive’s copy of Against the Grain, the woodcuts of Antonio Frasconi.
Title: Frasconi: Against the Grain
Format: book
ISBN: 002551009
Author: Antonio Frasconi
Publisher: Macmillan 
Binding: stitched paperback  
City: NY          
Country: USA            
Year: 1974
Size: 11.5” x 8.25”        
# of pages: 159
Provenance/Acquisition: purchased
Language: English        
Condition: good
Subject Tags: Artist, printmaker, Uruguay

Sadly Uruguayan printmaker Antionio Frasconi passed away earlier this month, on January 8th. Frasconi was an incredible woodblock printer that produced graphics on a variety of social issues. I was fortunate enough, many years ago, to view his The Disappeared prints at the Desaparecidos exhibition mounted at the Museo Del Barrio. The show was incredibly moving, and like many others, Frasconi’s works brought tears to my eyes.
Above is Interference Archive’s copy of Against the Grain, the woodcuts of Antonio Frasconi.

Title: Frasconi: Against the Grain
Format: book
ISBN: 002551009
Author: Antonio Frasconi
Publisher: Macmillan
Binding: stitched paperback
City: NY
Country: USA
Year: 1974
Size: 11.5” x 8.25”
# of pages: 159
Provenance/Acquisition: purchased
Language: English
Condition: good
Subject Tags: Artist, printmaker, Uruguay

Monday, January 28 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Interference Archive


Social movement scholar and writer Barbara Epstein would like our help with her current short book on the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States. She’s at the beginning of this project, but her aim is to help create a bridge between the generation/movement that she’s been a part of (socialist/Marxist leftists from the sixties) and the contemporary anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement.


Barbara will briefly introduce the following two questions, and then we’ll all grapple with these conundrums in a facilitated dialogue — our first experiment in a salon-style event:


What do you see as near-term and longer-term goals and strategies for the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States, especially taking into account the challenges posed by escalating environmental crises? What are the dangers faced by this movement under these conditions?


Currently, anarchist/antiauthoritarian movements are diffuse and episodic; people remain, but particular groupings around particular issues tend to come and go. Is this sufficient? Do we need more lasting and broader-reaching forms of organization? If so, how do you envision such forms?


Barbara teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the History of Consciousness Department. She was a member of the Communist Party for five years (she joined when she was eighteen and there was nothing else around); after she left the CP, she was on the editorial board of Socialist Revolution, later Socialist Review, for many years. She’s written three books; her two favorites are Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (UC Press, 1991), and The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (UC Press, 2008).

Monday, January 28 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Interference Archive


Social movement scholar and writer Barbara Epstein would like our help with her current short book on the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States. She’s at the beginning of this project, but her aim is to help create a bridge between the generation/movement that she’s been a part of (socialist/Marxist leftists from the sixties) and the contemporary anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement.


Barbara will briefly introduce the following two questions, and then we’ll all grapple with these conundrums in a facilitated dialogue — our first experiment in a salon-style event:


What do you see as near-term and longer-term goals and strategies for the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States, especially taking into account the challenges posed by escalating environmental crises? What are the dangers faced by this movement under these conditions?


Currently, anarchist/antiauthoritarian movements are diffuse and episodic; people remain, but particular groupings around particular issues tend to come and go. Is this sufficient? Do we need more lasting and broader-reaching forms of organization? If so, how do you envision such forms?


Barbara teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the History of Consciousness Department. She was a member of the Communist Party for five years (she joined when she was eighteen and there was nothing else around); after she left the CP, she was on the editorial board of Socialist Revolution, later Socialist Review, for many years. She’s written three books; her two favorites are Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (UC Press, 1991), and The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (UC Press, 2008).

What Does Utopia Look Like? A Show-and-Tell Talk with Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin
Friday, February 15 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Nothing is more romantic than utopia, even on the night after Valentine’s Day!

In a talk and slide show, Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin will draw from their new collaborative picture-essay book Paths toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism (PM Press, 2012; foreword by Josh MacPhee) along with other visions to offer various angles on how people have tried to answer the question, “What does utopia look like?”

They encourage audience members to bring their own utopian image (borrowed or made) to share and discuss.

If you can’t make this talk, you can catch them on Thursday, February 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, NY.

Cindy is a collective member of Interference Archive in Brooklyn as well as the Institute for Anarchist Studies. She’s been involved in various self-organized projects, including Black Sheep Books, Station 40, and Occupy Philly, and was a participant-writer of the Quebec student strike in Montreal this past summer. Cindy authored Anarchism and Its Aspirations (AK Press, 2010), has essays in anthologies such as We Are Many (AK Press, 2012), and blogs at cbmilstein.wordpress.com.

Erik is a Michigan-raised, Providence-based printmaker, shadow puppeteer, illustrator, and more. He also occasionally edits/publishes various publications, including the anthology Realizing the Impossible: Art against Authority (with Josh MacPhee, AK Press, 2005), and various art/book/music projects on the mini-label Desperate Commodities, co-run with Reid Books. He frequently works collaboratively with activists and other artists, most prominently/consistently Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative.

We’ll have books for sale, and donations are welcome to support the archive, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

What Does Utopia Look Like? A Show-and-Tell Talk with Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin
Friday, February 15 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Nothing is more romantic than utopia, even on the night after Valentine’s Day!

In a talk and slide show, Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin will draw from their new collaborative picture-essay book Paths toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism (PM Press, 2012; foreword by Josh MacPhee) along with other visions to offer various angles on how people have tried to answer the question, “What does utopia look like?”

They encourage audience members to bring their own utopian image (borrowed or made) to share and discuss.

If you can’t make this talk, you can catch them on Thursday, February 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, NY.

Cindy is a collective member of Interference Archive in Brooklyn as well as the Institute for Anarchist Studies. She’s been involved in various self-organized projects, including Black Sheep Books, Station 40, and Occupy Philly, and was a participant-writer of the Quebec student strike in Montreal this past summer. Cindy authored Anarchism and Its Aspirations (AK Press, 2010), has essays in anthologies such as We Are Many (AK Press, 2012), and blogs at cbmilstein.wordpress.com.

Erik is a Michigan-raised, Providence-based printmaker, shadow puppeteer, illustrator, and more. He also occasionally edits/publishes various publications, including the anthology Realizing the Impossible: Art against Authority (with Josh MacPhee, AK Press, 2005), and various art/book/music projects on the mini-label Desperate Commodities, co-run with Reid Books. He frequently works collaboratively with activists and other artists, most prominently/consistently Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative.

We’ll have books for sale, and donations are welcome to support the archive, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Current Exhibition!
Our Collection: A Sampler

In honor of our one-year birthday, we’ve installed a sampler from our own open-stack, open-access collection of cultural ephemera from social movements around the globe. You’ll find everything from Chinese, Cuban, and Polish posters to posters made as part of queer, feminist, and housing movements; to pamphlets produced by striking students, anarchists, third-world liberation struggle supporters, and antiprison as well as social justice movements; to stickers from a host of contemporary events and campaigns, and just for fun; to LP records and songbooks of resistance; and dozens and dozens of political buttons capturing the history of Left political movements in New York City over the past forty years; a mix of T-shirts and other fabric-related creations; to leftie newspapers and comic books.

Our in-house exhibit runs through mid-February.

Current Exhibition!
Our Collection: A Sampler

In honor of our one-year birthday, we’ve installed a sampler from our own open-stack, open-access collection of cultural ephemera from social movements around the globe. You’ll find everything from Chinese, Cuban, and Polish posters to posters made as part of queer, feminist, and housing movements; to pamphlets produced by striking students, anarchists, third-world liberation struggle supporters, and antiprison as well as social justice movements; to stickers from a host of contemporary events and campaigns, and just for fun; to LP records and songbooks of resistance; and dozens and dozens of political buttons capturing the history of Left political movements in New York City over the past forty years; a mix of T-shirts and other fabric-related creations; to leftie newspapers and comic books.

Our in-house exhibit runs through mid-February.

The Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture proudly presents promotes, and supports emerging visual artists who take risks, push boundaries, ask questions, and challenge their viewers.

Opening Tuesday, January 29, 2013, Activation is an exhibition of photographs and ephemera exploring the intersections between the underground punk-rock and radical leftist political movements in 1980s’ Washington, DC.

Featuring the work of Bert Queiroz whose photography captured the DC Hardcore scene (DCxHC) at its apex, Activation asks and explores how cultural production and political action can do more than work together, but also become one and the same.

Contextualized with ephemera on loan from Interference Archive, Activation focuses on the mid to late1980s when punk rock had arrived on the international stage and its players had come of age in the Nixon-Reagan years. Reacting to a tide of political and cultural conservatism, DCxHC sought to affect change both at home and abroad. Organizing innumerable benefit shows for local non-profits as well as participating in actions against such international issues as apartheid and the CIA led incursions in South and Central America, DCxHC catalyzed a dialog within the larger punk-rock movement of social progress through art.

Bert Queiroz is a photographer and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. Originally from Washington, DC, Bert was one of the original members of the punk & hardcore scene that gave birth to such influential bands as Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and Fugazi. Bert has also been the bass player in The Untouchables, (DC) Youth Brigade, Double-O, Second Wind, Meatmen, Rain, Manifesto, and Thunderball. In between all this music making, Bert was also budding photographer documenting the people and bands around him.

Special thanks to Interference Archive, a collectively run organization that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements through public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence.  Through its programming, Interference uses cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

Facebook invite: http://www.facebook.com/events/116869668485055/

The Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture proudly presents promotes, and supports emerging visual artists who take risks, push boundaries, ask questions, and challenge their viewers.

Opening Tuesday, January 29, 2013, Activation is an exhibition of photographs and ephemera exploring the intersections between the underground punk-rock and radical leftist political movements in 1980s’ Washington, DC.

Featuring the work of Bert Queiroz whose photography captured the DC Hardcore scene (DCxHC) at its apex, Activation asks and explores how cultural production and political action can do more than work together, but also become one and the same.

Contextualized with ephemera on loan from Interference Archive, Activation focuses on the mid to late1980s when punk rock had arrived on the international stage and its players had come of age in the Nixon-Reagan years. Reacting to a tide of political and cultural conservatism, DCxHC sought to affect change both at home and abroad. Organizing innumerable benefit shows for local non-profits as well as participating in actions against such international issues as apartheid and the CIA led incursions in South and Central America, DCxHC catalyzed a dialog within the larger punk-rock movement of social progress through art.

Bert Queiroz is a photographer and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. Originally from Washington, DC, Bert was one of the original members of the punk & hardcore scene that gave birth to such influential bands as Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and Fugazi. Bert has also been the bass player in The Untouchables, (DC) Youth Brigade, Double-O, Second Wind, Meatmen, Rain, Manifesto, and Thunderball. In between all this music making, Bert was also budding photographer documenting the people and bands around him.

Special thanks to Interference Archive, a collectively run organization that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements through public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. Through its programming, Interference uses cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

Facebook invite: http://www.facebook.com/events/116869668485055/

Interference Archive’s One-Year Birthday Party: January 16

Wednesday, January 16
7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

at Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY

It’s been one year since Interference Archive opened its doors, and with your help, we’ve already come a long way toward developing an autonomous space unlike any other in New York City. Collectively, we’ve built an impressive archive of social movement history from below. We’ve created a social center within which to study, process, debate, use, and produce work that reflects people’s struggles around the globe, past and present. And we’ve grown faster than we could have imagined!

Let’s celebrate together!

Join us for a festive one-year birthday party along with an exhibition of selected materials from the archive, the launch of our new Web site, and more. Details to come. Save the date and invite your friends: http://www.facebook.com/events/238037216329066/.

And because we’re mighty proud of all we’ve done so far — with the participation and support of so many of you — here are some highlights from our first year:

• An open-access, open-stack archive of cultural ephemera produced by and for social movements worldwide

• Five exhibitions, including the Persistence of Dreams, a retrospective of work by Sublevarte Collectivo from Mexico City; Radioactivity! Antinuclear Movements from Three Mile Island to Fukushima, co-curated with Todos Somos Japon; and Àvenir (“Future”), an installation by the Montreal-based design collective Ècole de la Montagne Rouge, active in the Quebec student strike of this past year

• Our first two publications, a booklet/map for RadioActivity! and a catalog for the Persistence of Dreams exhibit

• Talks and workshops, including the history of antiwar posters and graphics by archivist Carol Wells; a May Day poster critique and design charrette with Occuprint; and a look at a punk- and anarchist-inspired UK football club by Bristol Radical History Group’s Roger Wilson

• Film screenings in conjunction with our exhibits as well as movies such as Maggots and Men, Land of Destiny, and the premiere of The Days of the Commune

• A number of significant donations to the collection, including over 300 political protest buttons from Eleanor Bader, hundreds of posters from African and Latin American movements and solidarity organizations from Alexis De Veaux, and a large selection of antinuclear and peace posters from John Miller

Guns vs. Butter is an exhibition of antiwar graphics, bringing together the contemporary print work of the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative alongside posters from the historical collection housed in the Interference Archive. The exhibition contextualizes the work of current socially motivated graphics alongside a history of posters as an integral element of popular grassroots movements against war, colonialism, and military occupation.

This exhibition runs through January 6, 2013, at Future Tenant in Pittsburgh, PA

If you can’t make it to the exhibit in person, here’s an online tour of it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/visualresistance/sets/72157632271866932

Guns vs. Butter is an exhibition of antiwar graphics, bringing together the contemporary print work of the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative alongside posters from the historical collection housed in the Interference Archive. The exhibition contextualizes the work of current socially motivated graphics alongside a history of posters as an integral element of popular grassroots movements against war, colonialism, and military occupation.

This exhibition runs through January 6, 2013, at Future Tenant in Pittsburgh, PA

If you can’t make it to the exhibit in person, here’s an online tour of it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/visualresistance/sets/72157632271866932

About the Archive

Interference Archive 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215 (2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.) NEW HOURS We are currently open Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, noon to 5 p.m., or by appointment. We can be contacted at interferencearchive@gmail.com

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements by the participants themselves: posters, flyers, publications, photographs, books, T-shirts and buttons, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

La Persistencia de los Sueños/
The Persistence of Dreams
Sublevarte Colectivo
         Retrospective: 1999-2012 

November 16-December 31, 2012

Opening Reception: Friday, November 16, 2012, 7-10 p.m.
                                       Ongoing artists-led tour of exhibit, in Spanish and English

"Art & Revolt" Talk/Discussion: Tuesday, November 20, 7-9 pm

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike, Film and Discussion: Monday, November 26, 7-9 pm


As student movements around the world inspire us anew, Interference Archive invites Sublevarte Colectivo, a group born of the 1999 student strikes in Mexico City, to produce a retrospective exhibition of their thirteen years of graphic production. In La Persistencia de los Sueños, they will bring their graphic street interventions into the gallery to highlight the various social movements and uprisings in which they participated and supported.
Sublevarte Colectivo believes that the graphic arts should be a vehicle of expression and communication in society, and that these days the power of the visual image is stronger than words. They have brought this vision to their work with the Zapatistas, the flower sellers of Atenco, the striking teachers of Oaxaca, and dozens of other social struggles in Mexico.
”Our world is a space to express dreams and reality. We believe in an organization that is active every day and never gives up. Each line, color, and shape frame our destiny and the world we wish to create.”

Sublevarte Colectivo will also be speaking at the Wooden Shoe in Philly on Saturday, November 17 at 7 pm

For more info contact: Kevin Caplicki 917.293.2911 kevin@justseeds.org

Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012
Del 16 de Noviembre al 31 Diciembre de 2012
Recepción de apertura: Jueves 15 de Noviembre de 2012, 7-10 pm 

Mientras los movimientos estudiantiles de todo el mundo nos vuelven a inspiar, Interference Archive (El Archivo Interferencia) invita al Colectivo Sublevarte, un grupo que nació del movimiento estudiantil de1999-2000 en la Ciudad de México, a producir una exposición retrospectiva de sus trece años de producción gráfica. 

La Persistencia de los Sueños traerá sus intervenciones callejeras y gráficas a la galería, visitaremos los diversos movimientos sociales y los levantamientos en los que han participado y apoyado.

El Colectivo Sublevarte cree que las artes gráficas deben ser un vehículo de expresión y comunicación en la sociedad, y que en estos días el poder de la imagen visual es más fuerte que las palabras. Ellos han compartido esta visión de su trabajo con los zapatistas, los vendedores de flores de Atenco, lxs maestrxs en huelga de Oaxaca, y docenas de otras luchas sociales en México.

"Nuestro mundo es un espacio para expresar los sueños y la realidad. Creemos en una organización que esta activa todos los días y nunca se rinde. Cada línea, color y forma cuadra nuestro destino y el mundo que queremos crear. "

Interference Archive
131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn NY 11215
interferencearchive@gmail.com
Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays 12pm-5pm (also by appointment)
interferencearchive.org

La Persistencia de los Sueños/
The Persistence of Dreams
Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012 

November 16-December 31, 2012

Opening Reception: Friday, November 16, 2012, 7-10 p.m.
Ongoing artists-led tour of exhibit, in Spanish and English

"Art & Revolt" Talk/Discussion: Tuesday, November 20, 7-9 pm

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike, Film and Discussion: Monday, November 26, 7-9 pm


As student movements around the world inspire us anew, Interference Archive invites Sublevarte Colectivo, a group born of the 1999 student strikes in Mexico City, to produce a retrospective exhibition of their thirteen years of graphic production. In La Persistencia de los Sueños, they will bring their graphic street interventions into the gallery to highlight the various social movements and uprisings in which they participated and supported.

Sublevarte Colectivo believes that the graphic arts should be a vehicle of expression and communication in society, and that these days the power of the visual image is stronger than words. They have brought this vision to their work with the Zapatistas, the flower sellers of Atenco, the striking teachers of Oaxaca, and dozens of other social struggles in Mexico.

”Our world is a space to express dreams and reality. We believe in an organization that is active every day and never gives up. Each line, color, and shape frame our destiny and the world we wish to create.”

Sublevarte Colectivo will also be speaking at the Wooden Shoe in Philly on Saturday, November 17 at 7 pm

For more info contact: Kevin Caplicki 917.293.2911 kevin@justseeds.org

Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012
Del 16 de Noviembre al 31 Diciembre de 2012
Recepción de apertura: Jueves 15 de Noviembre de 2012, 7-10 pm

Mientras los movimientos estudiantiles de todo el mundo nos vuelven a inspiar, Interference Archive (El Archivo Interferencia) invita al Colectivo Sublevarte, un grupo que nació del movimiento estudiantil de1999-2000 en la Ciudad de México, a producir una exposición retrospectiva de sus trece años de producción gráfica.

La Persistencia de los Sueños traerá sus intervenciones callejeras y gráficas a la galería, visitaremos los diversos movimientos sociales y los levantamientos en los que han participado y apoyado.

El Colectivo Sublevarte cree que las artes gráficas deben ser un vehículo de expresión y comunicación en la sociedad, y que en estos días el poder de la imagen visual es más fuerte que las palabras. Ellos han compartido esta visión de su trabajo con los zapatistas, los vendedores de flores de Atenco, lxs maestrxs en huelga de Oaxaca, y docenas de otras luchas sociales en México.

"Nuestro mundo es un espacio para expresar los sueños y la realidad. Creemos en una organización que esta activa todos los días y nunca se rinde. Cada línea, color y forma cuadra nuestro destino y el mundo que queremos crear. "

Interference Archive
131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn NY 11215
interferencearchive@gmail.com
Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays 12pm-5pm (also by appointment)
interferencearchive.org

The Interference Archive is kept open by the generous donations of our supporters. We are looking for people to become “members” of the Archive, and help us continue to have a publicly accessible archive of social movement culture.

Those that are able to send us a monthly membership:

Member OptionsOption 1: $10.00 USD - monthlyOption 2: $25.00 USD - monthlyOption 3: $50.00 USD - monthlyOption 4: $100.00 USD - monthly



If a single donation is easier for you:




Thank you for your support!

The Interference Archive is kept open by the generous donations of our supporters. We are looking for people to become “members” of the Archive, and help us continue to have a publicly accessible archive of social movement culture. Those that are able to send us a monthly membership:

Member Options

If a single donation is easier for you:


Thank you for your support!
Interference Archive always welcomes financial contributions to keep our doors open, but material aid is equally appreciated. Here’s our “wish list” of things that would help sustain the archive and warm our hearts. If you want to donate anything on this list, stop by the archive during our open hours or send us an email: interferencearchive@gmail.com 

* High-quality 11x17 scanner
* Digital camera and/or lens
* Digital copy stand
* Digital audio recorder
* B & W laser printer
* Super-8 projector
* Record player
* Mac mini
* Office supplies
* Archival supplies (such as acid-free folders)
* Coat rack
* Folding chairs
* Rolling office chairs
* Mini frig
* Espresso machine
* First-aid kit
* Lumber
* Ceiling fan
* Architectural consultation on our current space (to better organize ourselves)
* Free storefront with lots of square footage inside (to better grow the archive)
* Cultural ephemera from/by social movements for our collection

Interference Archive always welcomes financial contributions to keep our doors open, but material aid is equally appreciated. Here’s our “wish list” of things that would help sustain the archive and warm our hearts. If you want to donate anything on this list, stop by the archive during our open hours or send us an email: interferencearchive@gmail.com

* High-quality 11x17 scanner
* Digital camera and/or lens
* Digital copy stand
* Digital audio recorder
* B & W laser printer
* Super-8 projector
* Record player
* Mac mini
* Office supplies
* Archival supplies (such as acid-free folders)
* Coat rack
* Folding chairs
* Rolling office chairs
* Mini frig
* Espresso machine
* First-aid kit
* Lumber
* Ceiling fan
* Architectural consultation on our current space (to better organize ourselves)
* Free storefront with lots of square footage inside (to better grow the archive)
* Cultural ephemera from/by social movements for our collection

Film Screening: “The Days of the Commune” (dir. Zoe Beloff; 150 min.)
Friday, December 14
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., Brooklyn 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
The 2.5-hour film starts promptly at 7:00 p.m.

In spring 2012, Zoe Beloff brought together a group of actors, activists, and artists to perform Bertolt Brecht’s play “The Days of the Commune” in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. Thinking about OWS as a radical theater of the people offered inspiration to conceptualize this project as a “work in progress” in a sense that all social movements are a work in progress. Rather than stage the play in a theater, it was performed scene by scene in public spaces around New York City. These public rehearsals ran from March through May, the months of the Paris Commune’s brief existence in spring 1871.

The Paris Commune was the first great modern occupation; working people took over their city and turned it into a progressive democracy of the people. Brecht shows us everyday life during the Commune, and at the same time asks us to think about how political and economic forces shape lived experience. His play invites us to imagine what would happen if a new kind of people’s democracy took over a city today. How could it survive against the forces of global capital? How should it respond to armed attack? The twentieth-century German marxist playwright doesn’t provide answers. Instead, Brecht invites each of us to think for ourselves.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive.

Film Screening: “The Days of the Commune” (dir. Zoe Beloff; 150 min.)
Friday, December 14
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., Brooklyn

Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
The 2.5-hour film starts promptly at 7:00 p.m.

In spring 2012, Zoe Beloff brought together a group of actors, activists, and artists to perform Bertolt Brecht’s play “The Days of the Commune” in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. Thinking about OWS as a radical theater of the people offered inspiration to conceptualize this project as a “work in progress” in a sense that all social movements are a work in progress. Rather than stage the play in a theater, it was performed scene by scene in public spaces around New York City. These public rehearsals ran from March through May, the months of the Paris Commune’s brief existence in spring 1871.

The Paris Commune was the first great modern occupation; working people took over their city and turned it into a progressive democracy of the people. Brecht shows us everyday life during the Commune, and at the same time asks us to think about how political and economic forces shape lived experience. His play invites us to imagine what would happen if a new kind of people’s democracy took over a city today. How could it survive against the forces of global capital? How should it respond to armed attack? The twentieth-century German marxist playwright doesn’t provide answers. Instead, Brecht invites each of us to think for ourselves.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive.

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike: 
Film Screening and Discussion with Sublevarte Colectivo

Monday, November 26 from 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo invite you to the film screening of La Píldoras del Doctor Barnés (Dr. Barnes’s Pills), a documentary film on the student strike of 1999-2000 at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). The screening will be followed by a discussion lead by Sublevarte Colectivo, a group of graphic activists that formed during the student strike. Collective members will talk about their experiences and participation in the strike.

The screening and discussion are in conjunction with Interference Archive’s exhibition “The Persistence of Dreams,” opening November 16 and featuring thirteen years of political street-art interventions by Sublevarte Colectivo.

Donations toward the work of Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo are welcome.

http://www.facebook.com/events/435584099821974/

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. Our work manifests in public exhibitions, a study center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements: posters, flyers, publications, T-shirts, stickers, photographs, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

http://interferencearchive.org/

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike:
Film Screening and Discussion with Sublevarte Colectivo

Monday, November 26 from 7-10 p.m.

Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo invite you to the film screening of La Píldoras del Doctor Barnés (Dr. Barnes’s Pills), a documentary film on the student strike of 1999-2000 at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). The screening will be followed by a discussion lead by Sublevarte Colectivo, a group of graphic activists that formed during the student strike. Collective members will talk about their experiences and participation in the strike.

The screening and discussion are in conjunction with Interference Archive’s exhibition “The Persistence of Dreams,” opening November 16 and featuring thirteen years of political street-art interventions by Sublevarte Colectivo.

Donations toward the work of Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo are welcome.

http://www.facebook.com/events/435584099821974/

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. Our work manifests in public exhibitions, a study center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements: posters, flyers, publications, T-shirts, stickers, photographs, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

http://interferencearchive.org/

Land of Destiny: Film Screening, with Director/Writer Brett Story

Friday, November 30, 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215
2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.

Land of Destiny (78 min, documentary), written and directed by Brett Story, focuses its lens on a hardworking petrochemical town rocked by revelations that its workers suffer an epidemic of cancers. But even more terrifying is the looming specter of deindustrialization and joblessness. Ex-pipefitters serving fries, basement musicians, boilermakers, volunteer firefighters, heartbroken widows, and an optimistic mayor — the lives of a diverse medley of characters intersect to reveal the dramas and contradictions of an industrial town out of sync with a postindustrial economy. In the rich fabric of the city’s landscape — rows of boarded-up storefronts, the bright sprawl of petrochemical plants and the swollen rooms of hospital wards and crowded bars - one finds a microcosm of the twenty-first century. A portrait of a working-class city in paralysis as well as a meditation on work and place in the modern economy, Land of Destiny offers an intimate story about labor, struggle, and survival.

Winner of the Canadian Environmental Media award in 2011 for “best documentary,” an honorable mention in 2010 at Planet Focus in Toronto, and an official selection in 2010 for the Recontres Internationales du Documentaire de Montréal, this documentary is directed by a good friend of Interference Archive; Brett will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss it afterward.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive and Brett’s next project.

Land of Destiny: Film Screening, with Director/Writer Brett Story

Friday, November 30, 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215
2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.

Land of Destiny (78 min, documentary), written and directed by Brett Story, focuses its lens on a hardworking petrochemical town rocked by revelations that its workers suffer an epidemic of cancers. But even more terrifying is the looming specter of deindustrialization and joblessness. Ex-pipefitters serving fries, basement musicians, boilermakers, volunteer firefighters, heartbroken widows, and an optimistic mayor — the lives of a diverse medley of characters intersect to reveal the dramas and contradictions of an industrial town out of sync with a postindustrial economy. In the rich fabric of the city’s landscape — rows of boarded-up storefronts, the bright sprawl of petrochemical plants and the swollen rooms of hospital wards and crowded bars - one finds a microcosm of the twenty-first century. A portrait of a working-class city in paralysis as well as a meditation on work and place in the modern economy, Land of Destiny offers an intimate story about labor, struggle, and survival.

Winner of the Canadian Environmental Media award in 2011 for “best documentary,” an honorable mention in 2010 at Planet Focus in Toronto, and an official selection in 2010 for the Recontres Internationales du Documentaire de Montréal, this documentary is directed by a good friend of Interference Archive; Brett will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss it afterward.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive and Brett’s next project.

Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press
February 21 - March 24, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 21 , 2013,
7:00-10:00 p.m.

The Vietnam War, class inequality, black liberation, and women’s struggles—against this backdrop of social upheaval, a rebellious counterculture produced a vibrant underground newspaper scene. In four short years, from 1965 to 1969, the underground press grew from five small newspapers in as many cities in the United States to over five hundred newspapers—with millions of readers—all over the world. Completely circumventing (and subverting) establishment media by utilizing its own news service and freely sharing content among the papers, the underground press at its height became the unifying institution for the alternative culture of the 1960s and 1970s. It also allowed for all sorts of intriguing and compelling art, design, and writing on its pages.

Interference Archive is pleased to host the exhibition Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press, curated by Sean Stewart, editor of On the Ground: An Illustrated Anecdotal History of the Sixties Underground Press in the U.S. (PM Press, 2011). The show features original copies from Sean’s growing collection of underground newspapers, such as Basta Ya, Berkeley Barb, Berkeley Tribe, Chicago Seed, Helix, It Ain’t Me Babe, Los Angeles Free Press, Osawatomie, Rat Subterranean News, San Francisco Express Times, San Francisco Oracle, Screw: The Sex Review, Black Panther, East Village Other, and Realist, and related artifacts to illustrate the process, graphic sensibilities, historical context, and debates shaping these periodicals.

For more info contact: Cindy Milstein, cbmilstein@yahoo.com

Sean Stewart grew up in Kingston, Jamaica, and is the former owner of Babylon Falling, a bookstore and gallery in San Francisco. He now lives in Brooklyn.

Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press
February 21 - March 24, 2013

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 21 , 2013,
7:00-10:00 p.m.

The Vietnam War, class inequality, black liberation, and women’s struggles—against this backdrop of social upheaval, a rebellious counterculture produced a vibrant underground newspaper scene. In four short years, from 1965 to 1969, the underground press grew from five small newspapers in as many cities in the United States to over five hundred newspapers—with millions of readers—all over the world. Completely circumventing (and subverting) establishment media by utilizing its own news service and freely sharing content among the papers, the underground press at its height became the unifying institution for the alternative culture of the 1960s and 1970s. It also allowed for all sorts of intriguing and compelling art, design, and writing on its pages.

Interference Archive is pleased to host the exhibition Rebel Newsprint: The Underground Press, curated by Sean Stewart, editor of On the Ground: An Illustrated Anecdotal History of the Sixties Underground Press in the U.S. (PM Press, 2011). The show features original copies from Sean’s growing collection of underground newspapers, such as Basta Ya, Berkeley Barb, Berkeley Tribe, Chicago Seed, Helix, It Ain’t Me Babe, Los Angeles Free Press, Osawatomie, Rat Subterranean News, San Francisco Express Times, San Francisco Oracle, Screw: The Sex Review, Black Panther, East Village Other, and Realist, and related artifacts to illustrate the process, graphic sensibilities, historical context, and debates shaping these periodicals.

For more info contact: Cindy Milstein, cbmilstein@yahoo.com

Sean Stewart grew up in Kingston, Jamaica, and is the former owner of Babylon Falling, a bookstore and gallery in San Francisco. He now lives in Brooklyn.

Sadly Uruguayan printmaker Antionio Frasconi passed away earlier this month, on January 8th. Frasconi was an incredible woodblock printer that produced graphics on a variety of social issues. I was fortunate enough, many years ago, to view his The Disappeared prints at the Desaparecidos exhibition mounted at the Museo Del Barrio. The show was incredibly moving, and like many others,  Frasconi’s works brought tears to my eyes. 
Above is Interference Archive’s copy of Against the Grain, the woodcuts of Antonio Frasconi.
Title: Frasconi: Against the Grain
Format: book
ISBN: 002551009
Author: Antonio Frasconi
Publisher: Macmillan 
Binding: stitched paperback  
City: NY          
Country: USA            
Year: 1974
Size: 11.5” x 8.25”        
# of pages: 159
Provenance/Acquisition: purchased
Language: English        
Condition: good
Subject Tags: Artist, printmaker, Uruguay

Sadly Uruguayan printmaker Antionio Frasconi passed away earlier this month, on January 8th. Frasconi was an incredible woodblock printer that produced graphics on a variety of social issues. I was fortunate enough, many years ago, to view his The Disappeared prints at the Desaparecidos exhibition mounted at the Museo Del Barrio. The show was incredibly moving, and like many others, Frasconi’s works brought tears to my eyes.
Above is Interference Archive’s copy of Against the Grain, the woodcuts of Antonio Frasconi.

Title: Frasconi: Against the Grain
Format: book
ISBN: 002551009
Author: Antonio Frasconi
Publisher: Macmillan
Binding: stitched paperback
City: NY
Country: USA
Year: 1974
Size: 11.5” x 8.25”
# of pages: 159
Provenance/Acquisition: purchased
Language: English
Condition: good
Subject Tags: Artist, printmaker, Uruguay

Monday, January 28 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Interference Archive


Social movement scholar and writer Barbara Epstein would like our help with her current short book on the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States. She’s at the beginning of this project, but her aim is to help create a bridge between the generation/movement that she’s been a part of (socialist/Marxist leftists from the sixties) and the contemporary anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement.


Barbara will briefly introduce the following two questions, and then we’ll all grapple with these conundrums in a facilitated dialogue — our first experiment in a salon-style event:


What do you see as near-term and longer-term goals and strategies for the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States, especially taking into account the challenges posed by escalating environmental crises? What are the dangers faced by this movement under these conditions?


Currently, anarchist/antiauthoritarian movements are diffuse and episodic; people remain, but particular groupings around particular issues tend to come and go. Is this sufficient? Do we need more lasting and broader-reaching forms of organization? If so, how do you envision such forms?


Barbara teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the History of Consciousness Department. She was a member of the Communist Party for five years (she joined when she was eighteen and there was nothing else around); after she left the CP, she was on the editorial board of Socialist Revolution, later Socialist Review, for many years. She’s written three books; her two favorites are Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (UC Press, 1991), and The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (UC Press, 2008).

Monday, January 28 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Interference Archive


Social movement scholar and writer Barbara Epstein would like our help with her current short book on the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States. She’s at the beginning of this project, but her aim is to help create a bridge between the generation/movement that she’s been a part of (socialist/Marxist leftists from the sixties) and the contemporary anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement.


Barbara will briefly introduce the following two questions, and then we’ll all grapple with these conundrums in a facilitated dialogue — our first experiment in a salon-style event:


What do you see as near-term and longer-term goals and strategies for the anarchist/antiauthoritarian movement in the United States, especially taking into account the challenges posed by escalating environmental crises? What are the dangers faced by this movement under these conditions?


Currently, anarchist/antiauthoritarian movements are diffuse and episodic; people remain, but particular groupings around particular issues tend to come and go. Is this sufficient? Do we need more lasting and broader-reaching forms of organization? If so, how do you envision such forms?


Barbara teaches at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the History of Consciousness Department. She was a member of the Communist Party for five years (she joined when she was eighteen and there was nothing else around); after she left the CP, she was on the editorial board of Socialist Revolution, later Socialist Review, for many years. She’s written three books; her two favorites are Political Protest and Cultural Revolution: Nonviolent Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s (UC Press, 1991), and The Minsk Ghetto, 1941-1943: Jewish Resistance and Soviet Internationalism (UC Press, 2008).

What Does Utopia Look Like? A Show-and-Tell Talk with Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin
Friday, February 15 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Nothing is more romantic than utopia, even on the night after Valentine’s Day!

In a talk and slide show, Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin will draw from their new collaborative picture-essay book Paths toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism (PM Press, 2012; foreword by Josh MacPhee) along with other visions to offer various angles on how people have tried to answer the question, “What does utopia look like?”

They encourage audience members to bring their own utopian image (borrowed or made) to share and discuss.

If you can’t make this talk, you can catch them on Thursday, February 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, NY.

Cindy is a collective member of Interference Archive in Brooklyn as well as the Institute for Anarchist Studies. She’s been involved in various self-organized projects, including Black Sheep Books, Station 40, and Occupy Philly, and was a participant-writer of the Quebec student strike in Montreal this past summer. Cindy authored Anarchism and Its Aspirations (AK Press, 2010), has essays in anthologies such as We Are Many (AK Press, 2012), and blogs at cbmilstein.wordpress.com.

Erik is a Michigan-raised, Providence-based printmaker, shadow puppeteer, illustrator, and more. He also occasionally edits/publishes various publications, including the anthology Realizing the Impossible: Art against Authority (with Josh MacPhee, AK Press, 2005), and various art/book/music projects on the mini-label Desperate Commodities, co-run with Reid Books. He frequently works collaboratively with activists and other artists, most prominently/consistently Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative.

We’ll have books for sale, and donations are welcome to support the archive, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

What Does Utopia Look Like? A Show-and-Tell Talk with Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin
Friday, February 15 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Nothing is more romantic than utopia, even on the night after Valentine’s Day!

In a talk and slide show, Cindy Milstein and Erik Ruin will draw from their new collaborative picture-essay book Paths toward Utopia: Graphic Explorations of Everyday Anarchism (PM Press, 2012; foreword by Josh MacPhee) along with other visions to offer various angles on how people have tried to answer the question, “What does utopia look like?”

They encourage audience members to bring their own utopian image (borrowed or made) to share and discuss.

If you can’t make this talk, you can catch them on Thursday, February 14, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., at Bluestockings Bookstore, 172 Allen Street, NY.

Cindy is a collective member of Interference Archive in Brooklyn as well as the Institute for Anarchist Studies. She’s been involved in various self-organized projects, including Black Sheep Books, Station 40, and Occupy Philly, and was a participant-writer of the Quebec student strike in Montreal this past summer. Cindy authored Anarchism and Its Aspirations (AK Press, 2010), has essays in anthologies such as We Are Many (AK Press, 2012), and blogs at cbmilstein.wordpress.com.

Erik is a Michigan-raised, Providence-based printmaker, shadow puppeteer, illustrator, and more. He also occasionally edits/publishes various publications, including the anthology Realizing the Impossible: Art against Authority (with Josh MacPhee, AK Press, 2005), and various art/book/music projects on the mini-label Desperate Commodities, co-run with Reid Books. He frequently works collaboratively with activists and other artists, most prominently/consistently Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative.

We’ll have books for sale, and donations are welcome to support the archive, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Current Exhibition!
Our Collection: A Sampler

In honor of our one-year birthday, we’ve installed a sampler from our own open-stack, open-access collection of cultural ephemera from social movements around the globe. You’ll find everything from Chinese, Cuban, and Polish posters to posters made as part of queer, feminist, and housing movements; to pamphlets produced by striking students, anarchists, third-world liberation struggle supporters, and antiprison as well as social justice movements; to stickers from a host of contemporary events and campaigns, and just for fun; to LP records and songbooks of resistance; and dozens and dozens of political buttons capturing the history of Left political movements in New York City over the past forty years; a mix of T-shirts and other fabric-related creations; to leftie newspapers and comic books.

Our in-house exhibit runs through mid-February.

Current Exhibition!
Our Collection: A Sampler

In honor of our one-year birthday, we’ve installed a sampler from our own open-stack, open-access collection of cultural ephemera from social movements around the globe. You’ll find everything from Chinese, Cuban, and Polish posters to posters made as part of queer, feminist, and housing movements; to pamphlets produced by striking students, anarchists, third-world liberation struggle supporters, and antiprison as well as social justice movements; to stickers from a host of contemporary events and campaigns, and just for fun; to LP records and songbooks of resistance; and dozens and dozens of political buttons capturing the history of Left political movements in New York City over the past forty years; a mix of T-shirts and other fabric-related creations; to leftie newspapers and comic books.

Our in-house exhibit runs through mid-February.

The Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture proudly presents promotes, and supports emerging visual artists who take risks, push boundaries, ask questions, and challenge their viewers.

Opening Tuesday, January 29, 2013, Activation is an exhibition of photographs and ephemera exploring the intersections between the underground punk-rock and radical leftist political movements in 1980s’ Washington, DC.

Featuring the work of Bert Queiroz whose photography captured the DC Hardcore scene (DCxHC) at its apex, Activation asks and explores how cultural production and political action can do more than work together, but also become one and the same.

Contextualized with ephemera on loan from Interference Archive, Activation focuses on the mid to late1980s when punk rock had arrived on the international stage and its players had come of age in the Nixon-Reagan years. Reacting to a tide of political and cultural conservatism, DCxHC sought to affect change both at home and abroad. Organizing innumerable benefit shows for local non-profits as well as participating in actions against such international issues as apartheid and the CIA led incursions in South and Central America, DCxHC catalyzed a dialog within the larger punk-rock movement of social progress through art.

Bert Queiroz is a photographer and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. Originally from Washington, DC, Bert was one of the original members of the punk & hardcore scene that gave birth to such influential bands as Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and Fugazi. Bert has also been the bass player in The Untouchables, (DC) Youth Brigade, Double-O, Second Wind, Meatmen, Rain, Manifesto, and Thunderball. In between all this music making, Bert was also budding photographer documenting the people and bands around him.

Special thanks to Interference Archive, a collectively run organization that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements through public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence.  Through its programming, Interference uses cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

Facebook invite: http://www.facebook.com/events/116869668485055/

The Center for Strategic Art and Agriculture proudly presents promotes, and supports emerging visual artists who take risks, push boundaries, ask questions, and challenge their viewers.

Opening Tuesday, January 29, 2013, Activation is an exhibition of photographs and ephemera exploring the intersections between the underground punk-rock and radical leftist political movements in 1980s’ Washington, DC.

Featuring the work of Bert Queiroz whose photography captured the DC Hardcore scene (DCxHC) at its apex, Activation asks and explores how cultural production and political action can do more than work together, but also become one and the same.

Contextualized with ephemera on loan from Interference Archive, Activation focuses on the mid to late1980s when punk rock had arrived on the international stage and its players had come of age in the Nixon-Reagan years. Reacting to a tide of political and cultural conservatism, DCxHC sought to affect change both at home and abroad. Organizing innumerable benefit shows for local non-profits as well as participating in actions against such international issues as apartheid and the CIA led incursions in South and Central America, DCxHC catalyzed a dialog within the larger punk-rock movement of social progress through art.

Bert Queiroz is a photographer and musician based in Brooklyn, NY. Originally from Washington, DC, Bert was one of the original members of the punk & hardcore scene that gave birth to such influential bands as Minor Threat, Bad Brains, and Fugazi. Bert has also been the bass player in The Untouchables, (DC) Youth Brigade, Double-O, Second Wind, Meatmen, Rain, Manifesto, and Thunderball. In between all this music making, Bert was also budding photographer documenting the people and bands around him.

Special thanks to Interference Archive, a collectively run organization that explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements through public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. Through its programming, Interference uses cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

Facebook invite: http://www.facebook.com/events/116869668485055/

Interference Archive’s One-Year Birthday Party: January 16

Wednesday, January 16
7:00 to 10:00 p.m.

at Interference Archive, 131 8th Street, #4, Brooklyn, NY

It’s been one year since Interference Archive opened its doors, and with your help, we’ve already come a long way toward developing an autonomous space unlike any other in New York City. Collectively, we’ve built an impressive archive of social movement history from below. We’ve created a social center within which to study, process, debate, use, and produce work that reflects people’s struggles around the globe, past and present. And we’ve grown faster than we could have imagined!

Let’s celebrate together!

Join us for a festive one-year birthday party along with an exhibition of selected materials from the archive, the launch of our new Web site, and more. Details to come. Save the date and invite your friends: http://www.facebook.com/events/238037216329066/.

And because we’re mighty proud of all we’ve done so far — with the participation and support of so many of you — here are some highlights from our first year:

• An open-access, open-stack archive of cultural ephemera produced by and for social movements worldwide

• Five exhibitions, including the Persistence of Dreams, a retrospective of work by Sublevarte Collectivo from Mexico City; Radioactivity! Antinuclear Movements from Three Mile Island to Fukushima, co-curated with Todos Somos Japon; and Àvenir (“Future”), an installation by the Montreal-based design collective Ècole de la Montagne Rouge, active in the Quebec student strike of this past year

• Our first two publications, a booklet/map for RadioActivity! and a catalog for the Persistence of Dreams exhibit

• Talks and workshops, including the history of antiwar posters and graphics by archivist Carol Wells; a May Day poster critique and design charrette with Occuprint; and a look at a punk- and anarchist-inspired UK football club by Bristol Radical History Group’s Roger Wilson

• Film screenings in conjunction with our exhibits as well as movies such as Maggots and Men, Land of Destiny, and the premiere of The Days of the Commune

• A number of significant donations to the collection, including over 300 political protest buttons from Eleanor Bader, hundreds of posters from African and Latin American movements and solidarity organizations from Alexis De Veaux, and a large selection of antinuclear and peace posters from John Miller

Guns vs. Butter is an exhibition of antiwar graphics, bringing together the contemporary print work of the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative alongside posters from the historical collection housed in the Interference Archive. The exhibition contextualizes the work of current socially motivated graphics alongside a history of posters as an integral element of popular grassroots movements against war, colonialism, and military occupation.

This exhibition runs through January 6, 2013, at Future Tenant in Pittsburgh, PA

If you can’t make it to the exhibit in person, here’s an online tour of it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/visualresistance/sets/72157632271866932

Guns vs. Butter is an exhibition of antiwar graphics, bringing together the contemporary print work of the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative alongside posters from the historical collection housed in the Interference Archive. The exhibition contextualizes the work of current socially motivated graphics alongside a history of posters as an integral element of popular grassroots movements against war, colonialism, and military occupation.

This exhibition runs through January 6, 2013, at Future Tenant in Pittsburgh, PA

If you can’t make it to the exhibit in person, here’s an online tour of it:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/visualresistance/sets/72157632271866932

About the Archive

Interference Archive 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215 (2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.) NEW HOURS We are currently open Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, noon to 5 p.m., or by appointment. We can be contacted at interferencearchive@gmail.com

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. This work manifests in public exhibitions, a study and social center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements by the participants themselves: posters, flyers, publications, photographs, books, T-shirts and buttons, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

La Persistencia de los Sueños/
The Persistence of Dreams
Sublevarte Colectivo
         Retrospective: 1999-2012 

November 16-December 31, 2012

Opening Reception: Friday, November 16, 2012, 7-10 p.m.
                                       Ongoing artists-led tour of exhibit, in Spanish and English

"Art & Revolt" Talk/Discussion: Tuesday, November 20, 7-9 pm

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike, Film and Discussion: Monday, November 26, 7-9 pm


As student movements around the world inspire us anew, Interference Archive invites Sublevarte Colectivo, a group born of the 1999 student strikes in Mexico City, to produce a retrospective exhibition of their thirteen years of graphic production. In La Persistencia de los Sueños, they will bring their graphic street interventions into the gallery to highlight the various social movements and uprisings in which they participated and supported.
Sublevarte Colectivo believes that the graphic arts should be a vehicle of expression and communication in society, and that these days the power of the visual image is stronger than words. They have brought this vision to their work with the Zapatistas, the flower sellers of Atenco, the striking teachers of Oaxaca, and dozens of other social struggles in Mexico.
”Our world is a space to express dreams and reality. We believe in an organization that is active every day and never gives up. Each line, color, and shape frame our destiny and the world we wish to create.”

Sublevarte Colectivo will also be speaking at the Wooden Shoe in Philly on Saturday, November 17 at 7 pm

For more info contact: Kevin Caplicki 917.293.2911 kevin@justseeds.org

Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012
Del 16 de Noviembre al 31 Diciembre de 2012
Recepción de apertura: Jueves 15 de Noviembre de 2012, 7-10 pm 

Mientras los movimientos estudiantiles de todo el mundo nos vuelven a inspiar, Interference Archive (El Archivo Interferencia) invita al Colectivo Sublevarte, un grupo que nació del movimiento estudiantil de1999-2000 en la Ciudad de México, a producir una exposición retrospectiva de sus trece años de producción gráfica. 

La Persistencia de los Sueños traerá sus intervenciones callejeras y gráficas a la galería, visitaremos los diversos movimientos sociales y los levantamientos en los que han participado y apoyado.

El Colectivo Sublevarte cree que las artes gráficas deben ser un vehículo de expresión y comunicación en la sociedad, y que en estos días el poder de la imagen visual es más fuerte que las palabras. Ellos han compartido esta visión de su trabajo con los zapatistas, los vendedores de flores de Atenco, lxs maestrxs en huelga de Oaxaca, y docenas de otras luchas sociales en México.

"Nuestro mundo es un espacio para expresar los sueños y la realidad. Creemos en una organización que esta activa todos los días y nunca se rinde. Cada línea, color y forma cuadra nuestro destino y el mundo que queremos crear. "

Interference Archive
131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn NY 11215
interferencearchive@gmail.com
Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays 12pm-5pm (also by appointment)
interferencearchive.org

La Persistencia de los Sueños/
The Persistence of Dreams
Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012 

November 16-December 31, 2012

Opening Reception: Friday, November 16, 2012, 7-10 p.m.
Ongoing artists-led tour of exhibit, in Spanish and English

"Art & Revolt" Talk/Discussion: Tuesday, November 20, 7-9 pm

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike, Film and Discussion: Monday, November 26, 7-9 pm


As student movements around the world inspire us anew, Interference Archive invites Sublevarte Colectivo, a group born of the 1999 student strikes in Mexico City, to produce a retrospective exhibition of their thirteen years of graphic production. In La Persistencia de los Sueños, they will bring their graphic street interventions into the gallery to highlight the various social movements and uprisings in which they participated and supported.

Sublevarte Colectivo believes that the graphic arts should be a vehicle of expression and communication in society, and that these days the power of the visual image is stronger than words. They have brought this vision to their work with the Zapatistas, the flower sellers of Atenco, the striking teachers of Oaxaca, and dozens of other social struggles in Mexico.

”Our world is a space to express dreams and reality. We believe in an organization that is active every day and never gives up. Each line, color, and shape frame our destiny and the world we wish to create.”

Sublevarte Colectivo will also be speaking at the Wooden Shoe in Philly on Saturday, November 17 at 7 pm

For more info contact: Kevin Caplicki 917.293.2911 kevin@justseeds.org

Sublevarte Colectivo
Retrospective: 1999-2012
Del 16 de Noviembre al 31 Diciembre de 2012
Recepción de apertura: Jueves 15 de Noviembre de 2012, 7-10 pm

Mientras los movimientos estudiantiles de todo el mundo nos vuelven a inspiar, Interference Archive (El Archivo Interferencia) invita al Colectivo Sublevarte, un grupo que nació del movimiento estudiantil de1999-2000 en la Ciudad de México, a producir una exposición retrospectiva de sus trece años de producción gráfica.

La Persistencia de los Sueños traerá sus intervenciones callejeras y gráficas a la galería, visitaremos los diversos movimientos sociales y los levantamientos en los que han participado y apoyado.

El Colectivo Sublevarte cree que las artes gráficas deben ser un vehículo de expresión y comunicación en la sociedad, y que en estos días el poder de la imagen visual es más fuerte que las palabras. Ellos han compartido esta visión de su trabajo con los zapatistas, los vendedores de flores de Atenco, lxs maestrxs en huelga de Oaxaca, y docenas de otras luchas sociales en México.

"Nuestro mundo es un espacio para expresar los sueños y la realidad. Creemos en una organización que esta activa todos los días y nunca se rinde. Cada línea, color y forma cuadra nuestro destino y el mundo que queremos crear. "

Interference Archive
131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn NY 11215
interferencearchive@gmail.com
Sundays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays 12pm-5pm (also by appointment)
interferencearchive.org

The Interference Archive is kept open by the generous donations of our supporters. We are looking for people to become “members” of the Archive, and help us continue to have a publicly accessible archive of social movement culture.

Those that are able to send us a monthly membership:

Member OptionsOption 1: $10.00 USD - monthlyOption 2: $25.00 USD - monthlyOption 3: $50.00 USD - monthlyOption 4: $100.00 USD - monthly



If a single donation is easier for you:




Thank you for your support!

The Interference Archive is kept open by the generous donations of our supporters. We are looking for people to become “members” of the Archive, and help us continue to have a publicly accessible archive of social movement culture. Those that are able to send us a monthly membership:

Member Options

If a single donation is easier for you:


Thank you for your support!
Interference Archive always welcomes financial contributions to keep our doors open, but material aid is equally appreciated. Here’s our “wish list” of things that would help sustain the archive and warm our hearts. If you want to donate anything on this list, stop by the archive during our open hours or send us an email: interferencearchive@gmail.com 

* High-quality 11x17 scanner
* Digital camera and/or lens
* Digital copy stand
* Digital audio recorder
* B & W laser printer
* Super-8 projector
* Record player
* Mac mini
* Office supplies
* Archival supplies (such as acid-free folders)
* Coat rack
* Folding chairs
* Rolling office chairs
* Mini frig
* Espresso machine
* First-aid kit
* Lumber
* Ceiling fan
* Architectural consultation on our current space (to better organize ourselves)
* Free storefront with lots of square footage inside (to better grow the archive)
* Cultural ephemera from/by social movements for our collection

Interference Archive always welcomes financial contributions to keep our doors open, but material aid is equally appreciated. Here’s our “wish list” of things that would help sustain the archive and warm our hearts. If you want to donate anything on this list, stop by the archive during our open hours or send us an email: interferencearchive@gmail.com

* High-quality 11x17 scanner
* Digital camera and/or lens
* Digital copy stand
* Digital audio recorder
* B & W laser printer
* Super-8 projector
* Record player
* Mac mini
* Office supplies
* Archival supplies (such as acid-free folders)
* Coat rack
* Folding chairs
* Rolling office chairs
* Mini frig
* Espresso machine
* First-aid kit
* Lumber
* Ceiling fan
* Architectural consultation on our current space (to better organize ourselves)
* Free storefront with lots of square footage inside (to better grow the archive)
* Cultural ephemera from/by social movements for our collection

Film Screening: “The Days of the Commune” (dir. Zoe Beloff; 150 min.)
Friday, December 14
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., Brooklyn 

Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
The 2.5-hour film starts promptly at 7:00 p.m.

In spring 2012, Zoe Beloff brought together a group of actors, activists, and artists to perform Bertolt Brecht’s play “The Days of the Commune” in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. Thinking about OWS as a radical theater of the people offered inspiration to conceptualize this project as a “work in progress” in a sense that all social movements are a work in progress. Rather than stage the play in a theater, it was performed scene by scene in public spaces around New York City. These public rehearsals ran from March through May, the months of the Paris Commune’s brief existence in spring 1871.

The Paris Commune was the first great modern occupation; working people took over their city and turned it into a progressive democracy of the people. Brecht shows us everyday life during the Commune, and at the same time asks us to think about how political and economic forces shape lived experience. His play invites us to imagine what would happen if a new kind of people’s democracy took over a city today. How could it survive against the forces of global capital? How should it respond to armed attack? The twentieth-century German marxist playwright doesn’t provide answers. Instead, Brecht invites each of us to think for ourselves.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive.

Film Screening: “The Days of the Commune” (dir. Zoe Beloff; 150 min.)
Friday, December 14
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., Brooklyn

Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
The 2.5-hour film starts promptly at 7:00 p.m.

In spring 2012, Zoe Beloff brought together a group of actors, activists, and artists to perform Bertolt Brecht’s play “The Days of the Commune” in solidarity with Occupy Wall Street. Thinking about OWS as a radical theater of the people offered inspiration to conceptualize this project as a “work in progress” in a sense that all social movements are a work in progress. Rather than stage the play in a theater, it was performed scene by scene in public spaces around New York City. These public rehearsals ran from March through May, the months of the Paris Commune’s brief existence in spring 1871.

The Paris Commune was the first great modern occupation; working people took over their city and turned it into a progressive democracy of the people. Brecht shows us everyday life during the Commune, and at the same time asks us to think about how political and economic forces shape lived experience. His play invites us to imagine what would happen if a new kind of people’s democracy took over a city today. How could it survive against the forces of global capital? How should it respond to armed attack? The twentieth-century German marxist playwright doesn’t provide answers. Instead, Brecht invites each of us to think for ourselves.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive.

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike: 
Film Screening and Discussion with Sublevarte Colectivo

Monday, November 26 from 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo invite you to the film screening of La Píldoras del Doctor Barnés (Dr. Barnes’s Pills), a documentary film on the student strike of 1999-2000 at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). The screening will be followed by a discussion lead by Sublevarte Colectivo, a group of graphic activists that formed during the student strike. Collective members will talk about their experiences and participation in the strike.

The screening and discussion are in conjunction with Interference Archive’s exhibition “The Persistence of Dreams,” opening November 16 and featuring thirteen years of political street-art interventions by Sublevarte Colectivo.

Donations toward the work of Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo are welcome.

http://www.facebook.com/events/435584099821974/

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. Our work manifests in public exhibitions, a study center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements: posters, flyers, publications, T-shirts, stickers, photographs, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

http://interferencearchive.org/

1999-2000 Mexican Student Strike:
Film Screening and Discussion with Sublevarte Colectivo

Monday, November 26 from 7-10 p.m.

Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo invite you to the film screening of La Píldoras del Doctor Barnés (Dr. Barnes’s Pills), a documentary film on the student strike of 1999-2000 at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). The screening will be followed by a discussion lead by Sublevarte Colectivo, a group of graphic activists that formed during the student strike. Collective members will talk about their experiences and participation in the strike.

The screening and discussion are in conjunction with Interference Archive’s exhibition “The Persistence of Dreams,” opening November 16 and featuring thirteen years of political street-art interventions by Sublevarte Colectivo.

Donations toward the work of Interference Archive and Sublevarte Colectivo are welcome.

http://www.facebook.com/events/435584099821974/

Interference Archive explores the relationship between cultural production and social movements. Our work manifests in public exhibitions, a study center, talks, screenings, publications, workshops, and an online presence. The archive consists of many kinds of objects that are created as part of social movements: posters, flyers, publications, T-shirts, stickers, photographs, moving images, audio recordings, and other materials. Through our programming, we use this cultural ephemera to animate histories of people mobilizing for social transformation.

http://interferencearchive.org/

Land of Destiny: Film Screening, with Director/Writer Brett Story

Friday, November 30, 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215
2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.

Land of Destiny (78 min, documentary), written and directed by Brett Story, focuses its lens on a hardworking petrochemical town rocked by revelations that its workers suffer an epidemic of cancers. But even more terrifying is the looming specter of deindustrialization and joblessness. Ex-pipefitters serving fries, basement musicians, boilermakers, volunteer firefighters, heartbroken widows, and an optimistic mayor — the lives of a diverse medley of characters intersect to reveal the dramas and contradictions of an industrial town out of sync with a postindustrial economy. In the rich fabric of the city’s landscape — rows of boarded-up storefronts, the bright sprawl of petrochemical plants and the swollen rooms of hospital wards and crowded bars - one finds a microcosm of the twenty-first century. A portrait of a working-class city in paralysis as well as a meditation on work and place in the modern economy, Land of Destiny offers an intimate story about labor, struggle, and survival.

Winner of the Canadian Environmental Media award in 2011 for “best documentary,” an honorable mention in 2010 at Planet Focus in Toronto, and an official selection in 2010 for the Recontres Internationales du Documentaire de Montréal, this documentary is directed by a good friend of Interference Archive; Brett will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss it afterward.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive and Brett’s next project.

Land of Destiny: Film Screening, with Director/Writer Brett Story

Friday, November 30, 7-10 p.m.
Interference Archive, 131 8th St., #4, Brooklyn, NY 11215
2 blocks from F/G/R trains at 4th Ave./9th St.

Land of Destiny (78 min, documentary), written and directed by Brett Story, focuses its lens on a hardworking petrochemical town rocked by revelations that its workers suffer an epidemic of cancers. But even more terrifying is the looming specter of deindustrialization and joblessness. Ex-pipefitters serving fries, basement musicians, boilermakers, volunteer firefighters, heartbroken widows, and an optimistic mayor — the lives of a diverse medley of characters intersect to reveal the dramas and contradictions of an industrial town out of sync with a postindustrial economy. In the rich fabric of the city’s landscape — rows of boarded-up storefronts, the bright sprawl of petrochemical plants and the swollen rooms of hospital wards and crowded bars - one finds a microcosm of the twenty-first century. A portrait of a working-class city in paralysis as well as a meditation on work and place in the modern economy, Land of Destiny offers an intimate story about labor, struggle, and survival.

Winner of the Canadian Environmental Media award in 2011 for “best documentary,” an honorable mention in 2010 at Planet Focus in Toronto, and an official selection in 2010 for the Recontres Internationales du Documentaire de Montréal, this documentary is directed by a good friend of Interference Archive; Brett will be on hand to introduce the film and discuss it afterward.

Donations are welcome to support the work of Interference Archive and Brett’s next project.

Interference Archive’s One-Year Birthday Party: January 16
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